The Aga Khan Award for Architecture Announces 2016 Shortlist

by Architects, © Luke Hayes

The Award 2016 announced the 19 shortlisted projects.  The projects, which were selected by the Master Jury from amongst 348 projects nominated for the 13th Award cycle, will be competing for US$ 1 million in prize money. The 19 projects are now undergoing rigorous investigations by on-site reviewers – architects, conservation specialists or structural engineers themselves – who visit and evaluate each project first-hand.  Their reports are the basis for the Master Jury’s selection of the eventual winners.

Among the shortlist 6 projects are in the MENA region following these project:

JORDAN

© Khammash Architects

, Ajloun

Architect:

© Khammash Architects

© Khammash Architects

The project is constructed in an abandoned stone quarry and acts as a healing intervention that is dramatically coexisting with the wounded nature. The building simply sits on the quarrying site which is left as skinless bone presenting a section in the Ajloun Mountain geology. The architecture celebrates the bedrock while preserving the surrounding mature forest, manifesting that damage of previous quarrying activities should and can be healed.

LEBANON

© Hufton Crow

,

Architect:

© Luke Hayes

© Hufton Crow

The Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs (IFI) building by Architects (ZHA) at the American University of (AUB) continues the on-going implementation of the 2002 AUB Campus Master Plan by Sasaki Associates (in collaboration with Machadoand Silvetti, MGT of America, and Dar Al-Handasa, Shair and Partners) to advance the university’s academic mission in the 21st Century with facilities of the highest international standards.

MOROCCO

© Fernando Guerra

, Guelmim

Architects: Saad El Kabbaj, Driss Kettani and Mohamed Amine Siana

© Fernando Guerra

© Fernando Guerra

The concept was to produce a contemporary building leaning towards modernity whilst paying tribute to its heritage and grounds. We truly believe that this is a case of ‘Mission Accomplished’. With the cladding technique symbolizing all that is Moroccan earth, the structure follows a simplistic and clean-cut modern approach focusing on linearity and symmetry. This is the defining true brilliance of this project which ticks all the right boxes without one being able to obviously point out the reason why. The buildings are organized following an L-form pattern and are positioned in a north-south axis. Their volume is quite massive creating a great contrast between interior and exterior. However, this over scaling is balanced out with the protruding square & rectangular openings; a feature which is breathtaking through its continuity.

Casa-Port New Railway Station, Casablanca

Architect:

© Didier Boy de La Tour

© Didier Boy de La Tour

© Didier Boy de La Tour

This transport hub, designed to anticipate 25 million passenger trips per year in the future, comprises a large passenger hall opening onto a wide square to the southwest and the platforms to the southeast, a shopping centre located on the lower level of the hall, an underground car park and an office building. The dimensions of the vast concourse and the walkways leading to the transverse platform are designed to deal with commuter travel and peak time loadings occurring over the same periods during the day. The architecture of the station hall is characterised by its hypostyle roof, a wide canopy of wood and steel extending beyond the facades to jut out over the square, and thin supporting columns, the upper part of which split into eight branches to filter sunlight through the skylight. The hall’s glass facades enable travellers to grasp the organisation of the station and its walkways and, on the west side, a contemporary mashrabiyya-like system filters the strong afternoon sunlight. In anticipation of ture transformations, the hub has been devised in a way that allows its future connection with a potential regional express line station. In its spaces, volumes, materials, lighting and geometry, the station carries on the heritage of Moroccan palaces and public buildings, while paying tribute to the modernity of Casablanca.

QATAR

Doha Tower, Doha
Architect:

SAUDI ARABIA

© Christian Richters

King Fahad National Library,

Architect:

© Christian Richters

© Christian Richters

The King Fahad National Library, one of the most important cultural buildings in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was completed and went into use for its intended purpose in November 2013. This project sees Professor Eckhard Gerber and his Gerber Architekten team accomplishing one of the most important urban development and cultural projects in the capital, Riyadh. The design functions as the central driving force behind a piece of urban development and rearrangement, and combines the challenge of designing within the existing building stock with respect for Arabian culture.

 

For the full list of the projects from cycle 2014-2016 click


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